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The Henry
Beaufort
School

Design and Technology

 

 

 

EXAM BOARD

AQA

ASSESSMENT FORMAT

50% examination

50% non-exam assessment

GRADE METHOD

9-1

 

GCSE

The Design and Technology GCSE encompasses a range of different materials: textiles, graphics, wood, metal, plastics, paper and electronics. There will be the opportunity to ‘specialise’ in either Textiles or Resistant Materials if you choose this option.

 

Design & Technology is a subject that brings learning to life, requiring learners to apply their learning to real life situations.

 

Students will study:

    Core technical principles

    Specialist technical principles

    Designing and making principles

 

Non Exam Assessment 50%

A substantial design and make task based on a contextual challenge. For example:

    a high profile event

    addressing the needs of the elderly

    the contemporary home

    children’s learning and development

    the world of travel and tourism

RESISTANT MATERIALS

KEY STAGE 3

During Year 7, 8 and 9, Resistant Materials teaches students to make decisions about the use of materials, tools and equipment for a planned piece of work, involving shaping, joining, finishing and evaluating their final product. In doing so, students will study the characteristics of working properties of ferrous and non-ferrous metals, softwood and hardwood timbers and thermoplastics and thermoset plastics, while studying industrial processes such as injection moulding, casting, welding and brazing and the reasons why one process is more suited to a product than another.

 

GCSE

At GCSE, the two year programme of study in Resistant Materials aims to develop our students' skills and knowledge further, culminating in a major project conducted in Year 11 which contributes 60% of the marks towards the final grade. Common projects involve the planning and making of toys or games that have marketing potential, such as an early learning toy suitable for pre-school children or mechanical ‘executive' toys suitable for desktop use.

 

IT in Resistant Materials

Solidworks, 3D Design, 2D Design, programmable technology, nutritional analysis, CAD, BBC Mircobit, crumbles.

 

Numeracy Literacy in Resistant Materials

Numeracy- Reading scales, scale and proportion, ratios, percentages, data analysis, isometric drawing, measuring.

Literacy- Technical terminology, expression of ideas, annotations, oral expressions, text planning, reasoned explanations.

 

TEXTILES

KEY STAGE 3

Students choosing to study Textiles in Year 9 will undertake projects which build on their experience at KS3 and prepare them for GCSE.  Modules studied in Year 9 include recycling, electronic textiles, garment making and computer generated printing.  This solid foundation to GCSE reflects the specification and assessment criteria at GCSE giving students an accurate insight into the demands of GCSE Textiles.


GCSE

Students in Year 10 & 11 build on the substantial knowledge and skills accumulated during the previous 3 years.  They complete 2 pieces of Controlled Assessment, each comprising a practical textile product and supporting design folder.  Students choose the type of product made, discussing the possibilities with specialist textiles staff to ensure the product is of suitable complexity and emphasises the student’s particular skills set.  Each controlled assessment forms 30% of the final GCSE mark, with the remaining 40% resulting from the final written examination.  

To read more about the Yorkie'sBoys Only Textiles Club, please click here. For the Girls 4 Girls Charity Project, please click hereand here.

 

IT in Textiles

Solidworks, 3D Design, 2D Design, programmable technology, nutritional analysis, CAD, BBC Mircobit, crumbles.

 

Numeracy and Literacy in Textiles

Numeracy- Reading scales, scale and proportion, ratios, percentages, data analysis, isometric drawing, measuring.

Literacy- Technical terminology, expression of ideas, annotations, oral expressions, text planning, reasoned explanations.

 

Prevent Duty and British Values in Textiles

Prevent

We are committed to ensuring that our students are offered a broad and balanced curriculum that aims to prepare them for life in modern Britain. We encourage our students to be inquisitive learners who are open to new experiences and are tolerant of others.

These values support the development of the whole student as a reflective learner within a calm, caring, happy and purposeful atmosphere. Teaching the schools core values alongside the fundamental British Values supports quality teaching and learning, whilst making a positive contribution to the development of a fair, just and civil society.

The internetprovides young people with access to a wide-range of content, some of which is harmful. Extremists use the internet, including social media, to share their messages. The filtering systems used in our school blocks inappropriate content, including extremist content.

We also filter out social media, such as Facebook. Searches and web addresses are monitored and the ICT technicians will alert senior staff where there are concerns and prevent further access when new sites that are unblocked are found. Where staff, students or visitors find unblocked extremist content they must report it to a senior member of staff.

We are aware that young people have access to unfiltered internetwhen using their mobile phones and staff are alert to the need for vigilance when students are using their phones.

Students and staff know how to report internetcontent that is inappropriate or of concern.

 

British Values

We promote tolerance through different people’s ideas that may be built on cultural diversity which promotes mutual respect.

Students have the opportunity to work independently and as a team to build resilience and self‐esteem through tasks. When working in groups students are expected to share ideas and resources and encourage and support each other. By promoting high expectations through the setting of ground rules, students are rewarded for positive behaviour.

 

SMSC in Textiles

Spiritual- Imagination, inspiration, instilinga sense of awe, wonder and mystery, encouraging creativity.

Moral- Students are given an awareness of the moral dilemmas created by technological advances. Encouraging students to become responsible consumers.

Social- Industrial visits, opportunities to work as a team, promoting equality of opportunity, providing an awareness of areas of gender issues.

Cultural- Diversity of materials and ways in which technology can improve the quality of life. Investigate how different cultures have contributed to technology.